Krampus

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

From Wikipedia:

    Krampus is a beast-like creature from the folklore of Alpine countries thought to punish bad children during the Yule season, in contrast with Saint Nicholas, who rewards nice ones with gifts. Krampus is said to capture particularly naughty children in his sack and carry. them away to his lair.<

    Krampus is represented as a beast-like creature, generally demonic in appearance. The creature has roots in Germanic folklore. Traditionally young men dress up as the Krampus in Austria, southern Bavaria, South Tyrol, Hungary, Slovenia and Croatia during the first week of December, particularly on the evening of 5 December, and roam the streets frightening children with rusty chains and bells. Krampus is featured on holiday greeting cards called Krampuskarten. There are many names for Krampus, as well as many regional variations in portrayal and celebration.

I’ve vaguely known about Krampus for some time, but it wasn’t until I saw a Krampus sweater on a talk shows “Ugly Sweater Day” that I decided to look into Krampus more closely.

After I decided to research more a Facebook friend decided post the 12 days of Krampus. Then another place asked for Krampus photos.

So I got in on the act.

Krampus is an interesting figure. The Anti-Claus and a part of European pagan traditions. Adopted almost as the opposite to the Christian Saint Nicholas who Santa Claus would be based on in later years.

From Wikipedia:

    The history of the Krampus figure stretches back to pre-Christian Germanic traditions. He also shares characteristics with the satyrs of Greek mythology. The early Catholic Church discouraged celebrations based around the wild goat-like creatures, and during the Inquisition efforts were made to stamp them out. However, Krampus figures persisted, and by the 17th century Krampus had been incorporated into Christian winter celebrations by pairing them with St. Nicholas.

    It is believed that the tradition of donning the costume of Krampus came about as part of a coming of age ritual for young men. They would be sent off into the forest/mountains with not much more than a small sack of provisions – similar to many coming-to-manhood traditions still found in various iterations all over the world. He comes back down to the village after his time in the wild dressed as Krampus, embodying the wild spirit he took with him from this time living as a wild animal in the woods. Attempting to frighten young children was a test of the mettle of the children of the village, and also part of their coming-of-age process to demonstrate their bravery in front of the horned man from the mountains.

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Krampus is very similar in appearance to the Chriastian Devil/Satan.

From Wikipedia:

    Although Krampus appears in many variations, most share some common physical characteristics. He is hairy, usually brown or black, and has the cloven hooves and horns of a goat. His long pointed tongue lolls out.

    Krampus carries chains, thought to symbolize the binding of the Devil by the Christian Church. He thrashes the chains for dramatic effect. The chains are sometimes accompanied with bells of various sizes. Of more pagan origins are the ruten, bundles of birch branches that Krampus carries and occasionally swats children with. The ruten have significance in pre-Christian pagan initiation rites. The birch branches are replaced with a whip in some representations. Sometimes Krampus appears with a sack or a washtub strapped to his back; this is to cart off evil children for drowning, eating, or transport to Hell.

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

In contrast to Christmas, Krampus has his own celebration, Krampusnacht.

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

From Wikipedia:

    The Feast of St. Nicholas is celebrated in parts of Europe on December 6. In Alpine countries, Saint Nicholas has a devilish companion named Krampus. On the preceding evening, Krampus Night or Krampusnacht, the hairy devil appears on the streets. Sometimes accompanying St. Nicholas and sometimes on his own, Krampus visits homes and businesses. The Saint usually appears in the Eastern Rite vestments of a bishop, and he carries a ceremonial staff. Unlike North American versions of Santa Claus, in these celebrations Saint Nicholas concerns himself only with the good children, while Krampus is responsible for the bad. Nicholas dispenses gifts, while Krampus supplies coal and the ruten bundles.

    Krampuslaufen

    A Krampuslauf is a run of celebrants dressed as the beast, often fueled by alcohol. It is customary to offer a Krampus schnapps, a strong liqueur. These runs may include perchten, similarly wild pagan spirits of Germanic folklore and sometimes female in representation, although the perchten are properly associated with the period between Winter Solstice and January 6. In larger cities, there may be numerous runs throughout the Advent season.

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Krampuskarten

    Europeans have been exchanging greeting cards featuring Krampus since the 1800s. Sometimes introduced with Gruß vom Krampus (Greetings from the Krampus), the cards usually have humorous rhymes and poems. Krampus is often featured looming menacingly over children. He is also shown as having one human foot and one cloven hoof. In some, Krampus has sexual overtones; he is pictured pursuing buxom women. Over time, the representation of Krampus in the cards has changed; older versions have a more frightening Krampus, while modern versions have a cuter, more Cupid-like creature. Krampus has also adorned postcards and candy containers.

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

Uploaded by Photobucket Mobile for BlackBerry

The portrayal of Krampus and Saint Nicholas is the age old Good vs Evil. It harkens to the stories of old and new. It is also very similar in portrayal to Christ vs Satan.

For more information visit Wikipedia.

Advertisements

One thought on “Krampus

  1. Nice blog on the Krampus! Thanks for mentioning my (13) 12 Days of Krampus! I’ve been trying to get people interested for years. It’s a whole extension of Halloween if you ask me. The long, darkening nights of winter were ones for telling ghost stories and stories of the paranormal or abnormal…centering around the darkness, which is finally dispelled during the Solstice. The idea of getting coal or onions in your stocking was a big one with my mother, who was German. I think one season she actually did put limps of coal and branches in our stockings as a joke. So she must have at least been a part of the Krampus tradition.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s